November 26, 2018

These tips will help make your rental application a success

January is a busy month for rentals of homes and flats no matter what size, so here are some tips to ensure everybody on all sides of the application gets great results.

Tip 1 - Look at the website to see what information you’ll need to provide - usually online.

Here’s the information you’ll be expected to provide at Tenancy Portal, which is the online service Rentals.co uses to coordinate applications:

  • Address of the property you’re applying for, and whether you have driven past it
  • Whether you have already viewed the property (this is an essential step)
  • Name, date of birth and gender
  • Social media profiles such as LinkedIn and Facebook, if helpful
  • ID - a photo of your driver licence, passport or 18+ card
  • Proof of income
  • Proof of current address
  • Number of dependent people you wish to have in the tenancy with you
  • Information about your weekly income and Work & Income status, if applicable
  • References
  • Details of last tenancies
Tip 2 - Make yourself personable, and get to know which property manager you’ll be working with

The staff at Rentals.co may react a fraction quicker if you’re greeting them by name and if you can tell us exactly the person you’re looking for to handle your enquiry. By looking at the website you can get briefed on who works for the company and how to contact them, bringing a humane touch to the process. Note the property manager for each property is given on the property’s TradeMe page.

Tip 3 - Understand that you can occasionally negotiate certain conditions.

Perhaps the landlord doesn’t allow large dogs but will make an exception for a small dog. Photos of the pets may help.

Tip 4 - Bring the human touch.

Let the property manager know who’s in your family, how old everybody is and what they do for a living. It helps to provide a complete picture about the circumstances of the applicant. Photos of the family are welcome.

Tip 5 - Please study the location of the rental property

No property manager wants tenants disappointed or surprised that the property isn’t near a certain shop, or has no playground nearby, or is in the wrong school zone. Please do a Google Maps search of the area, drive-bys and visits.

Tip 6 - Try not to miss a viewing

Property managers tend to have up to 100 properties each to manage. It makes the application process difficult if you, as the applicant, don’t attend a carefully-scheduled viewing.

Tip 7 - Referees are shared between property management companies

The right reference from your previous property, plus your current employer, really helps.

Tip 8- Expect a credit check.

This is a normal part of the application process, and helps ensure the tenant’s budget isn’t being stretched too far.

Tip 9 - Budgeting and haggling are important.

Landlords may consider negotiating the price of the rental if you don’t stretch yourself and take on a property you can’t afford. Long-term, safe, reliable tenants are valued more than short-term tenants because there are fewer unfilled transitional weeks at the property.

Tip 10 - You can’t offer the property manager a letting fee.

Rentals.co follows the law diligently, and as of December 12 2018, letting fees cannot be given or received in application for a property.

Tip 11 - Your bond is essential.

Have it put aside, if possible. You should find the bond for each property specified on the TradeMe advertisement for each property.

Tip 12 - Your tenancy tribunal history may be checked.

Tenancy Tribunal decisions are very public, so please consider that any past involvement in the tribunal may contribute information to the application. It helps to be honest and up-front about anything which may affect your application.

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